The vulgarity of the British

Examples of social decline, especially in the UK

Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Yessica » 26 Oct 2013, 07:29

Apart from that having nothing to do with tourette and that "experiment" being highly unscientific I highly doubt you can bear pain any better if you concentrate on it and swear about it.

My own "recipe" for dealing with pain: think about something completly different and unrelated (and preferably nice)... try to memorize the best recipe for cherry pie you know, focus on remembering how to make this pie or something like this.

What is your experience?
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Nathan » 29 Nov 2013, 17:24

Black Friday, British style:

Image

I've seen similar pictures from the Boxing Day sales on Oxford Street, but this is the first time I'd heard of Black Friday being "celebrated" over here - a completely empty occasion, considering we haven't had Thanksgiving yesterday and this week means nothing to us.

Somehow the bovine-looking faces in that photo make the scene look even more depressing.

http://uk.news.yahoo.com/asda-black-fri ... 36702.html
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 29 Nov 2013, 21:50

Indeed. I take advantage of "Black Friday" each year to purchase selected soft synths and sample packs online, and I very much like the idea of gratitude that seems to be inherent to "Thanksgiving". But that is of course absent here in the UK - and here "Black Friday" just seems to convert into "Evil Friday".

I'm afraid British people are often considered some of the ugliest in the world - or at least in the Western world. That wouldn't matter if so many weren't ugly on the inside too and didn't deliberately make themselves hideous on the outside.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 01 Dec 2013, 10:48

I have not often written of the vulgarity of the British recently. Although I live most of the time in an underclass area of the UK where 90% of people are tattooed, I have described this already so refrain from repeating myself. The reason I don't write more on this topic is because most of the time I have been working from home. The moment, however, one is obliged to be among the general public, one immediately, invariably, experiences vulgarity.

Today I am travelling to London. The local train service was cancelled, so a bus replacement service was arranged. I boarded the bus and noticed an underclass thug (the wirey rather than the muscle-bound kind) lounging in the seats with the most room - those near the emergency exit. This vicious looking individual lay back with his legs up over the barrier, eyeing everyone with a dopey yet challenging expression. Beside him, occupying two more seats, was his "ho". I say this because this is how he described her. He kept calling her a "skank". She was indeed clearly a skank - a naturally good looking girl but common and she had gone to great lengths to make herself ugly.

The thug repeatedly goaded her, calling her a skank and otherwise insulting her. She didn't like this (but certainly was not about to leave him, I am sure, secretly respecting him). She threw a few insults back - everyone could hear. I plugged my earphones in (I also carry earplugs because sometimes I don't feel like listening to music and resent being obliged to so just to escape vulgarity). The bus was otherwise populated mainly by older people.

Eventually one elderly woman stood up and said to the skank:

"You should not talk like that. You have no respect for anyone on this bus - or for yourself."


I thought to myself "Oh no. That thug is going to get up and hit her". But, strangely, a pensioner is best placed in modern Britain to be able to object to the vulgarity and degeneracy one witnesses every day: there is a chance that louts will not see them as "a challenge" so might not attack them, and they are less likely to face the force of the (liberal) law than I would be, for example, for "victimising" these thugs (I would call them animals but as I have discussed previously my cat Blackie is far more likeable than these). Both the skank and her man uttered some objections but nothing too extreme. They carried on swearing at each other and generally being vulgar.

Why did the bus driver not eject them? Well, he was driving the bus, and later I noticed that he himself did not seem to be a particularly civilised individual.

After a few minutes a Virgin Trains employee who was also making the journey got up and walked over to the two degenerates (they were white, I add). He politely appealed to them to keep the "conversation" down. He did not look like a hard man, but the uniform may have helped him escape abuse. So, they kept the noise down for a little while and then, of course, started again.

At the same time as this was going on, the radio was blaring out such inane rubbish to the poor pensioners and me that I felt like it was slowly turning my brain to mush. Hyperactive trash and a mixture of Celine Dion and Hip-hop (c)rap. It was horrible. I caught up on some YouTube viewing (Aurini, to be precise) on my phone.

After a little while the bus stopped and let two young women on who proceeded to talk for the entire remainder of the journey without any concern for anybody else (as is often the case). Aurini continued his talk, appropriately about liberal narcissists. The two women gabbled on and on about superficial rubbish. I folded down the cup holder in front of me to find it dirty and full of chewing gum.

I thought "Are we there yet?". Eventually we were. At the main station I popped into the newsagent to keep warm. Here's what confronted me:

20131201_093732.jpg


I am now seated in the First Class "Quiet Zone" carriage on the train. Such a description is no guarantee whatsoever of a civilised environment, however. I hope not to have to spend too much time writing about my fellow Brits during this trip, but the evil of liberalism has created a society which is very unpleasant for any civilised person to have to endure now, so I may feel the need.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Charlie » 01 Dec 2013, 11:38

Gavin wrote: two degenerates


Gavin wrote:I caught up on some YouTube viewing (Aurini, to be precise) on my phone


I see he has influenced your vocabulary too. I now find myself using the word 'degenerate' all the time!

There are enough of them around here! :-)
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 01 Dec 2013, 12:03

It's a good word, one I have used before (most recently about the Roma, I see, on a quick search!). Yes, it's good to hear Aurini using it, though. I like how he is so scathing of the "sexual degeneracy" of liberals too. He's a strong figure in the "manosphere", I think - certainly no nihilist, as some are. Needs a good woman to notice him.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Jan 2014, 13:04

Further to my mention of "Quiet Zone" carriages, above, I am on another one now. Of course, it isn't though. A man is speaking with no attempt at all to limit his volume. Further up the carriage two women are seated engrossed in a loud, superficial conversation. They are seated at the table where I was originally sitting (in my assigned seat).

It was one of those moments when you're in your seat (as can happen at the opera or the cinema) and you think "Yes, this is going to go okay... we're nearly away!" then at the very last minute one or two people who prove themselves to be vulgarians come and sit right beside you or in front of you, blowing your hopes. Prior to their arrival it had just been me and a girl nearby, who was mercifully quiet. She's now having to endure them too, but I moved.

As the pair blundered in I sensed an air of over-confidence and feminist entitlement. They spoke aloud that they needed seats 2 and 3 (I was in 4). The whole possible future of the journey flashed before my mind's eye: me sitting there pinned in while these two spoke as loud as they liked in the Quiet Carriage about stupid things. It was bound to happen. So I quickly said "I think those seats are here, and you know what, I think I might move, give us a bit more room". They replied "Yes, we have reserved a table". So had I, of course.

So I can hear them now, from down the other end. This is simply yet another example of a considerate person (which I try to be) having to move to accommodate the inconsiderate. Not under threat of violence this time, as is often the case, but I suppose you could say under threat of feminist assertion, because I sensed a bolshie manner. There was no gratitude, only entitlement.

Now there is just an older lady nearby (though the previous two must have been in their thirties) and a younger one who is reading some trash magazine and playing with her iPhone. Here in the UK, even the most "deprived" people have iPhones, cigarettes and alcohol, and in this country many of the thick never seem to want for money.

To finish, I suppose this happens because the thick pay the thick. Nightclub frequenters pay for nightclub bouncers. Football obsessives pay footballers' salaries. Idiots pay for idiotic music. I will have a little more to say about that later..!
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Charlie » 19 Jan 2014, 13:33

Q: Where would we be without iPacifiers, psychobabble and the vulgar?

A: Well, not on the “Quiet Coach”, I presume!

This is a subject which I meant to write about the other day after a similar ordeal to yours, Gavin. Suffice to say that I witnessed many of the same things; the only difference was that, in addition, a smell, much like that of a toilet in its death throes, was wafting through the train compartment!

It kind of summed up the whole "Quiet Coach" experience really!
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 19 Jan 2014, 14:30

Thanks Charlie. It would not surprise me if these days, due to the almost complete breakdown in manners, standard coaches are quieter than so-called quiet ones. At least no louder.

I suppose that what we have now is what we might have expected. The post-war welfare state and the values of relativism have created a nightmare society in terms of "things in common" and manners. Financing the thick and irresponsible to have as many children as they like was always going to result in a horrible, vulgar society.

Speaking of which, I have now alighted in Wolverhampton. I had never before visited this town near Birmingham, but the mere mention of these places is enough to strike fear into a civilised Englishman. Now I see why.

I have never before witnessed so much multiculturalism and depravity outside certain parts of London - and I speak only of my short walk from the station to the hotel, via the town centre, in the daytime! I must have seen about 40 horrible studs in people's faces, the usual tattoos on nearly everyone, fat people, Sihks, black people, Muslims and very common, rough-looking white English. This is the "rainbow nation" we were promised, only it looks more like the Blade Runner society but without the Orientals (they're up in Manchester).

Thumping music from cars, run down buildings, the majority of people I encountered so far have been Indians. Let's the say, the Cotswolds it isn't. Modern Britain. They would simply not believe you if you told them in 1945.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 26 Jan 2014, 11:47

As I sat in the hotel lounge this morning watching ear-ringed children run riot and thuggish parents chat to each other across the room, uncaring, another sound also reached my ears: the sound of their wives.

This brought into my mind the phrase “the merry laugh”; the kind of phrase which might appear in an eighteenth or nineteenth century poem.


I thought to myself “Is there such a thing as a ‘merry laugh’ any more?”.

The erupting cackle. The sarcastic sneer. The uncontrolled guffaw. I do not think I have heard “the merry laugh” for a very long time.

Modern humour is cynical and often cruel. Laughter seems to match it. Men are often oafish, but it seems particularly tragic to see women devoid of gentleness and kindness. They are usually coarse, common and loud, or cold and stone-faced, with unduly high self-opinions. I often chat to staff about what I perceive, and they seem to genuinely agree.

No judgement can be made though, of course, no decency imposed - only inasmuch as the law will allow. For example, the police were called the other day and seven men were ejected from a room where they were smoking and being very loud. The staff couldn’t handle them all on their own.

It often seems to me, as I travel around, that the law (and a kind of thick, tabloid, soap opera sense of morality) just about holds society together these days, with genuine manners and decency a distant memory. As I have said before, I was never particularly concerned about money, but in modern Britain it has become a necessary aim in order to shelter oneself from vulgarity. In my experience Dalrymple is precisely right in his observation of "poverty of the soul" among many, many Britons. There is a decadent coarseness and corruption, combined sense of self-esteem in precise inverse proportion to merit. While all these people can vote, too, it's hard to see how downward cultural trajectory can be turned around.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 31 Jan 2014, 08:23

On the Quiet Zone again! A woman was talking very loudly on her phone, as usual - but this time some of the public objected. I joined in.

Her response was to complain that she was being victimised. She stopped talking on the phone but is now talking loudly without it instead, presumably to make some kind of statement. She was just a middle aged woman, so an objection could be made. Had it been a younger person then the response would probably have been much more indignant and profane.

These days it seems nobody ever accepts responsibility for having done wrong, or even for having made a mistake.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Roger » 01 Feb 2014, 13:48

Whenever I book rail tickets in advance I always select the quiet carriage, a gesture which appears to be futile at least half of the time. Nothing spoils one's contemplative enjoyment of the British countryside or a good book quite like the inane babblings of fellow passengers, or the screeching of families to whom the definition of 'quiet' can only mean 'people won't tell my kids off for being loud and obnoxious.'
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 01 Feb 2014, 14:06

I'm seriously wondering whether, due to the near extinction of empathy and good manners in the UK, we might not be better off just booking in the standard carriages these days..!
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Gavin » 04 Feb 2014, 21:41

Since I am among the general public as I travel to work, I experience numerous incidents of vulgarity every day. Thugs chaotically cycling (usually no-handed) down pavements, illegally. People speaking loudly on their phones, oblivious to all those around them.

The two most obvious acts of vulgarity (indeed, in the latter case criminality) that I have witnessed in the last couple of days both happen to have been perpetrated by black people. I mention this because I believe their being black was relevant in that they seemed to have enormous chips on their shoulders and to see themselves as being persecuted (probably because of their colour) when, in fact, whatever trouble they were having was entirely due to their own behaviour.

The first instance involved a woman on a train yesterday. The train was very crowded. She was the type of black woman - you've probably encountered the type - who has a short haircut and a perpetually angry, indignant, expression on her face. She was on the phone, speaking at full volume in her Birmingham accent. I heard "Jesus Christ!" and "F**king hell!" and various other obscenities (I was right next to her on a packed train with nowhere else to go).

Woe betide the person brave enough to criticise her for her disgusting behaviour, though! I could tell she would have loved to launch into anybody who so much as looked at her for a split second too long, probably accusing them of being racist. This woman (though she was somewhat androgynous) evidently had a child (quelle surprise), would not be there to collect them from school, and was furious that someone else would not do this for her.

The second incident was more serious. Yesterday morning I recorded a major altercation between a white ticket conductor and a belligerent black passenger who refused to alight from the train when requested to do so. He was making personal remarks, insulting the conductor and so on. He had his small son with him. He did not have a ticket and insisted on buying on on the train, which was delayed by ten minutes because of this incident.

Today, I saw the same man with his son, so I sat in a different carriage. Lo and behold, the train was again delayed, this time by almost half an hour. He had had a second altercation with the conductor, and this time police were called. Even with them he refused to disembark, was waving his arms, shouting and so on. I thought the police were going to taser him, but eventually they managed to wrestle him to the ground and cuff him (at high risk of the usual claims of "violence against blacks" etc.). I managed to speak to the conductor, who was quite shaken up, and offered him my recording of yesterday. This might be provided to police and I suppose I might even be asked to attend court at some point. I will of course be happy to help the man be punished to the full extent that the law allows, though in reality we know that he will probably get away scot free and might even win a case against the arresting police and receive compensation from the train company.

Just another day in modern Britain, folks. I could probably post an anecdote daily, but neither time nor energy allow (!), so I'll just post when I can.
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Re: The vulgarity of the British

Postby Paul » 04 Feb 2014, 23:48

Gosh I could fill this thread to overflowing if I was so minded.

I'm not. As you say Gavin, time and inclination - meaning yes, the energy to do so. Even pondering the things you may see, let alone looking more closely for them, is kind of wearying in itself.

It's also embarrassing in a way. People of some quality undoubtedly read these pages and then there are readers from other countries. Reporting things close to you might suggest you are (too) closely involved! They might think you live in a really bad area. But the fact is, you live in the UK, end of story. Are there any dreaming spires and quaint villages left?

As for actually getting involved, one has to beware. And then as you say, what will actually come of it at court - if it gets that far?


The other day I heard of a local 20 year old youth who has been kidnapped, tied to a chair and threatened with a hot iron ( a clothes iron) close to his face. This is because he may simply know the perpetrators of a supposed burglary that has been attempted on a house allegedly growing skunk (marijuana).

He has been obviously traumatised, his (single) mother has found out about it and thence acted in vigilante fashion, going round to the assailants' house (the supposed skunk house) and threatening her own brand of violence (which included mention of supposed rival 'gangsters'). They in turn have threatened to shoot her dogs (naturally she has two large dogs - to go with the five kids). It's all currently teetering on a knife-edge I hear.

In all of this there has been no mention or sign of the Police.

This has all happened very local to my workplace but thankfully two weekends ago when I wasn't there (I often am however). A neighbour has told me in hushed tones and apparently all the other locals know about it, the location of the house and the various allegations therein. I know where the house is too. The occupants are continually smoking skunk - you can easily smell it on the corner of the street, regularly, especially in nicer weather - when windows are open or they may be outside. It's just brazen.

Remember - the Police are nowhere to be seen. In fact I seriously cannot remember when I last saw a PC, in uniform, walking the streets. Years ago, surely.

It's a strange and uneasy place now and has become so in the last five to ten years, though it's been brewing for thirty.
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