Care in the community

Thoughts on the welfare state and the British underclass

Care in the community

Postby Gavin » 09 Mar 2013, 11:16

Here's a story for you. I was having a quiet pint and a read in the pub last night. It was getting on for midnight, so nearly turning out time. All of a sudden a man in his forties came over and sat near me. He made that kind of kind of arrival that makes a statement - it wasn't quiet: there was a lot of huffing and puffing as he hung his coat over the back of his chair and then he sat there looking at me.

Eventually he spoke:

Man: Mate. Mate? That computer you got there. I can never understand nothin' about computers. Can you tell me which one to get?


This was going to potentially be a long conversation, and a pointless one if he could indeed never understand anything. I told him the basics. I will now switch to dialogue and I'm going to type this verbatim, as best as I can remember it.

Man: Right mate. It's f**kin' crazy around here these days. You can't speak to f**kin' no-one. Look at me. I've ordered Coke. I don't drink no more. Ever since I were inside.

Me: Oh, were you inside, then?

Man: I done two and a half years in an army prison. You ain't never done nothin' like that. I got beasted every day. Every day, mate.

Me: That sounds bad.

Man: [Moves to my table] Yeah, I can only go out cos they got me f**kin' full of this anthrax they're injectin' into me. It's for me depression, see. I got three lovely kids but I can't live with the wife no more. I had to leave, for the sake of the kids. I was too dangerous at home. Don't get me wrong. I never touched them.

Me: Right.. so are you better now?

Man: I get this terrible anxiety. I come out in skin rashes all over, look. [Pulls up trouser leg to reveal skin rash] It's the drugs. They got me stoked up.

Me: Well, I hope they're helping you.

Man: I had to stop drinking. That's helpin'. But if anyone so much as looks at me the wrong way I will f**kin' kill 'em. I'm known round here. No-one f**ks with me. Ever since I got back.

Me: Got back?

Man: I was in the Gulf. I saw things, you can't get over that.

Me: I'm sure you must have seen some bad things.

Man: Yeah but I get 'em now. You can get 'em, [moves forward, conspiratorial] wrap 'em in barbed wire and set fire to 'em, that's what I do. No-one knows. They can't catch you. They never f**k with you again.

Me: Right…

Man: I get hired by firms. That's how I get by now. And the drugs. And me kids.

Me: Right.. how many people have you done this to so far?

Man: You're not f**kin' CID are you?

Me: No, no..

Man: About seven, eight now. Wrap 'em in barbed wire and set fire to 'em. No-one'll ever get you.

Me: Right.. well, it's been nice meeting you. I think they're closing up. I'll have to be on my way.

Man: Right mate. Very nice to meet you. Shaun. You are?

Me: Gavin

Man: Right mate, cheerio.


At this point the fellow extended his hand. I could either decline due to the aforementioned skin condition and risk my life or shake it (and risk my life). I shook it. Then I hurried home and washed my hands.

I wasn't frightened of this guy because I wasn't going to do anything to antagonise him and I calculated that, though he was paranoid, he was unlikely to attack me since he had selected me for friendly conversation. Halfway through the conversation I realised this was something quite unusual and it occurred to me to try to record him, but I don't often have my phone with me these days. He was very impassioned and locking me with a stare - it would have been hard to get to the controls anyway and I didn't want to do anything to inflame him. He came across as friendly but at the same time probably insane.

I think he probably was full of drugs and perhaps something disturbing had happened in his past. I didn't want to think about what the "beasting" was.

This is quite a funny article, but also quite sad, because here, surely, is a case of care in the community. Possibly a dangerous man, probably a delusional one - with three children, as is often the case.

I do feel a little bit like I am in a foreign country, living in the North, listening to them and observing how they go on. It's their area though, so of course I keep a low profile (as I probably would anyway) but am friendly and try to fit in. A lot of them in this particular area look dangerous (this man had the mandatory tattoos all over his hands), but some I have met are like this - that strange combination of polite and friendly and boasting of their psychopathy. These are people who have probably achieved very little and perhaps it says something about their contemporaries that they believe that speaking about their propensity for violence will be the path to respect.

All in all, this man was a sad case. I'd like to have sat longer with him because it was interesting, but I'm not sure I should really have someone like this, someone so very different to me and potentially violent, thinking I am his friend. Dalrymple must have met hundreds of men like this, and I had my own little taste of the experience last night.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Gavin » 26 May 2014, 19:20

A few minutes ago I was sitting on a small regional train which links up with Preston. Most of the people on the train were obviously native English underclass, but there were also one or two African people.

One was a woman, probably in her forties, who got on and sat in the seat behind me. She had one of those big laundry bags which was very full - of something. One outspoken northerner joked that it looked like she “had a body in there”. She laughed.

But what concerned me is that for the remainder of the twenty minutes journey this woman had an intense conversation. Sometimes it was hushed, sometimes louder. Often there were vehement disagreements. Now, I’m a fairly seasoned traveller and used to inner cities: I knew there was a 50/50 chance as to whether this woman was speaking on a bluetooth headset or simply to herself. She didn’t look like the kind of person who would be using bluetooth.

I hoped and hoped, because the seats were very close together on this cramped train, and it was pretty full. I hoped she didn’t get into a serious disagreement with herself, or see me glancing around, which I did occasionally, and produce a knife and simply kill me from behind. I gather a paranoid schizophrenic is very easily offended - even by nothing by all.

Eventually I did move. I was becoming very curious to see whether this woman was on the phone or not, and I was becoming fed up with the constant jabbering, which was in a third world language, as one would typically hear on a London bus (but now, evidently, anywhere in the UK). No bluetooth, no phone in sight.

Please tell me, of what benefit are foreign people in our country who are halfway (or completely) crazy? And if there is some irrefutable benefit, why are they allowed out in public (why are any crazy people allowed out?). They scare people, and sometimes they do kill people.

Thanks again, Labour. And thanks Dave for doing nothing about it.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Nathan » 26 May 2014, 20:35

I used to see loads of them in London, though actually native British people were still a large majority of them. I used to wonder if the impersonal fast-paced environment was more likely to have created their insanity or people with those problems were just drawn to the city. I agree that it is scary when you don't know how to behave around them because you have no way of knowing how they will react to things.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Lindsey » 27 May 2014, 16:16

It's always quite intimidating to meet people who are delusional, however that's not enough alone to section a person, though the first man you met sounds like he aught to be under some kind of authority, having worked in autism services, it's sadly more often the case that these people's become the victims of assault rather than the other way round . Self-talkers are quite the target for groups of roving youths . infact many of them do have autism rather than paranoid delusion , but getting attacked so often will give them further mental health issues, causing then to fear leaving the house at all. Care in the Community in these cases becomes an institution without the walls, people become trapped and isolated without the chance to socialise or be in a secure environment. The flip side of the coin is that those that do enter supported living environments like it and it can be difficult to get then to leave , even when their condition is under control.
It's a sad fact that genuine mental illness exists (as opposed to so many newly created self inflicted 'mental illness' such as addiction,) people succumbing to it succumb same way animals do in zoos - rocking swaying, repetition, hair pulling, skin biting. We realise in zoos the problem is the concrete unnatural environment and lack of appropriate socialisation yet we rarely seem to acknowledge that human beings are every bit as sensitive and upset by a featureless overcrowded and socially warped environment as much as other animals are.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Yessica » 27 May 2014, 19:25

Interesting thoughts, Lindsey.
There is but one difference between us humans and the animals in the zoo. We as humans can change our surroundings at least a bit or change our attitude towards them. Possibly trying to do that vs. succumbing to fate is one thing which sets the healthy person apart from the troubled one.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Lindsey » 27 May 2014, 21:43

Sadly people who end up with mental illness (provided it isn't organic) really cannot change their circumstances or imagine they cannot. Its no coincidence more issues are found on sink estates and often begin in childhood when somebody is genuinely unable to change circumstances on their own. However, it's not quite what I meant, rather that ugliness and over crowding I believe are contributing factors. If you live in a city, even if you work and save money, there is a good chance you cannot escape it, not in the short term anyway.
Interestingly, I used to know an ex Mormon missionary who exercised demons in the amazon whilst converting locals (it was this that lead to his atheism) he encountered many young women "possessed" and indeed they acted possessed , to such an extent nobody came near then. He quickly realised most of the young women were victims of severe sexual abuse within their family home, and with no way out became possessed, ie - socially repellent. We have no such behaviour in the west because we do not really believe in possession, hence we don't believe we will be infected by demonic forces by sleeping with somebody possessed. These girls made no conscious decision to behave this way, it appeared to be an absolute last resort to protect ones self. It's interesting and it raises many questions , but it is a genuine result of a lack of option,
Many people cannot escape their own lives, they may not have the mental capacity to imagine they could in the first place,
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Nathan » 27 May 2014, 22:01

It's interesting to have somebody on here who has experience of the topic, Lindsey. Like I said earlier I used to see a lot of mentally ill people on the street in London, but while most of the ones I saw were white I've heard a number of people mention that this problem is noticeably more common among black people, which I believe the stats confirm.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/807945.stm

The link above from 2000 plays the racist card more than the once (the reason why I chose an old link was to showcase the very typical spin from that era) and denies anything biological in it at all, but do you have any insight into this given your experience?

I can understand that black people are more likely to grow up in poverty and in dysfunctional households and in the cities, and every time they see a white face on TV or on advertising billboards or hear anybody mention race it might subconsciously remind them of permanently being different whether they like it or not, but they are apparently six times more likely to be diagnosed schizophrenic than white people - that's a huge difference for only social factors to be at work.

I realise it's a very sensitive issue!
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Yessica » 28 May 2014, 06:52

Lindsey wrote:Many people cannot escape their own lives, they may not have the mental capacity to imagine they could in the first place.


I cannot understand this one to be honest, isn't there always something you can do to change your life or to change your attitude about things?

What, in your opinion, sets people who do not have that mental capacity apart from the rest of us?

Do you only work with people who have autism or also other forms of mental illness?

I do know some people who have mental health diagnoses - nearly all off them middle class, but that is because I know more middle class people than those form other classes.
It usually involves something that happened in their pasts - often in their childhoods. You cannot change the past by definition, you could do your best to either learn from it or forget about it or embrace it as a part of your life. Dwelling on the past you cannot change anyway seems dysfunctional.

I think I mentioned before that to my mind some people dwell on a past that never happened. I am highly skeptical of childhood sexual abuse not remembered for years and discovered through memory techniques.
It is so sad if some people let that not only blight their lifes but also that of their children... because the child really has no choice.

To my mind grown-ups need to learn how to suck it up at the best of their abilities if they can do that.
Unfortunately I came to the coclusion that being a survivor of child sexual abuse became so trendy in certain circles that there is no need to suck anything up and some people even exaggerate symptoms because they think that it is the proof their abuse was worse than that suffered by others which would make them some kind of queen.

I do not say that all or even most child sexual abuse is imagined. I do however think that it sometimes happens, unfortunately the suffering is still real.

Some people dwell on a past that did happen and there is much proof for that. Again I do not see the point which may be the case because I had nothing really bad happening to me. I did try to understand it but I think I cannot. I simply cannot understand there is something you cannot snatch out of if you really want too. I sometimes do think "Oh, if I was in the shoes of him or her I would do better", but of course I have no proof.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Paul » 15 Jun 2014, 21:29

Gavin, I must have overlooked this thread up to now, and so had not previously read those stories you have told, one in the pub and one on the train. How alarming. I do recall a similar, though milder, incident related by my brother earlier in the year, which I posted here

I was a little concerned again that you averred it was only in the North of England that these people exist, and was then rather relived to hear that Nathan has seen 'loads of them in London'. What a thing to be relieved about. But yes surely, these type of people are everywhere now? Drugs are everywhere. Cheap liquor is everywhere. One only needs to watch some of these live Police Camera type of programmes to see the most incongruous or even once picturesque towns blighted by barbarians of all stripes. There will be a 'schizophrenic' or two among every group, you can depend upon it.

I agree with how Yessica sees the problem. There seems always some supposed 'reason' for people behaving foolishly or even crazily.

I see these mechanisms as very akin to lefties constantly wailing about 'equality', or blacks about slavery, or the Scots about Bannockburn, and then justifying bad behaviour and malcontentedness on the back of these ancient gripes.

They need to get over it I say. I personally have more than ample reasons for going 'crazy', for what's happened to me over long years of societal decline, but I don't do it.

At least not yet! :-)

The usual caveats about the 'genuine cases'. But who or what are the genuine cases? And so many of them...?
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Paul » 15 Jun 2014, 23:13

And so rather neatly I then come across this recent piece by the incorrigible Jim Goad over at Takis. I agree with him, as usual.


The Mental Illness Cop-Out.

It all seemed so deliberate.

According to court documents, on May 31 two twelve-year-old Wisconsin girls led a female classmate into the woods and stabbed her 19 times, leaving her for dead. Under police examination, the pair of girls said they’d been planning to kill her for months. (She survived.)

Police say the two girls had originally plotted to murder their victim during a sleepover. Their plan involved duct-taping her mouth shut, stabbing her fatally in the neck, and pulling the covers over her corpse to give the appearance that she was sleeping. Instead, they switched gears and agreed to kill her the next day in the bathroom of a nearby public park, which had a floor drain they thought would hide the blood as it oozed from her dying body. When one of the alleged perps panicked in the bathroom, the girls again altered their plans and led their victim into the woods to play hide and seek.

According to the allegedly self-incriminating testimony of 12-year-old Anissa Weier, after stabbing the girl, she told her to lie down and be quiet, which would make her lose less blood as she and her accomplice went to get help. Weier told police that she never intended to get help. She said she only wanted the victim to quit screaming and drawing attention to the crime scene as the life ebbed out of her.

“The bad part of me wanted her to die, the good part of me wanted her to live,” Weier reportedly told police. Her alleged accomplice, Morgan E. Geyser, is quoted as saying, “I didn’t feel remorse.”

The girls also told authorities that they committed the crime to appease Slender Man, a tall, slim, faceless fictional online horror character who has the ability to grow long tendrils from his hands and back. They became obsessed with Slender Man after viewing horror website Creepypasta Wiki. They said they believed he resided in a Wisconsin mansion and that they’d go live with him after offering him this blood sacrifice.

The girls’ neighbors expressed shock, claiming that they were “very nice” and came from “normal, middle-class” families. The two are being charged as adults with intentional homicide and could face up to 60 years in prison if convicted.

Given their alleged elaborate planning, I also doubt that the girls’ tender age absolves them of ill intent. Children are far smarter than adults tend to acknowledge. Most adults seem to forget being children. Perhaps that’s part of the brain degeneration and diminished responsibility that comes with adulthood.

But that will never stop a defense lawyer from seeking a cheap cop-out. “She’s 12 and she has mental health issues,” said Anthony Cotton, one of the girls’ defense attorneys. “There’s no question that she needs to go to the hospital.”

Whenever someone says there is “no question” about any given matter, my first instinct is to question it. And the very idea of “mental illness” reeks to high holy heaven of bullshit to me. It reminds me of other obvious falsehoods such as the idea that rape has nothing to do with sex, that race doesn’t exist but racism is everywhere, and that alcoholism is a disease rather than a character flaw.

The very idea of “mental illness” is schizoid. It implies that the “illness” is somehow a separate entity from the person, thus casting responsibility on the illness rather than the person. Isolating the illness allows one to pretend that their personality is infected with a germ, when the more likely explanation is that they simply have a bad personality. The fundamental error in the idea of “mental illness” lies in creating a fictional duality between the person’s imaginary affliction and the core of their very being.

This in no way discounts the reality of neurological disorders. Those are physical conditions that can be quantified. But in most cases, “mental illness” seems like a cheap and dishonest way of avoiding what are fundamental character flaws.

Despite his later unfortunate collaborations with Scientologists, Thomas Szasz nailed this concept in his 1960 essay “The Myth of Mental Illness,” which was expanded into a bestselling book a year later:

Mental illness, of course, is not literally a “thing”—or physical object—and hence it can “exist” only in the same sort of way in which other theoretical concepts exist. … As such, it is a true heir to religious myths in general, and to the belief in witchcraft in particular. ... Our adversaries are not demons, witches, fate, or mental illness. We have no enemy whom we can fight, exorcise, or dispel by “cure.” What we do have are problems in living—whether these be biologic, economic, political, or sociopsychological.

Merely for stating the obvious, Szasz was treated by most of those who stood to gain significant revenue from the psychiatric profession as a witch. Blaming one’s deliberate actions on “mental illness” is a modern version of “The Devil made me do it”—or, in this latest case, “Slender Man made me do it.”

Modern society is apparently awash in “mental illness” and drowning in pills to treat it. How easily we have forgotten the well-documented political abuse of psychiatry in communist regimes and barbaric practices such as lobotomies and electroshock therapy. All the new mood stabilizers and happy pills seem to have erased memories of how psychiatry has traditionally been used as a hammer to smash the souls and crush the will of political dissidents and simple nonconformists.

I’ve never seen a psychological diagnosis or a psychiatric medication improve anyone’s mood, behavior, or life circumstances. I’ve only seen dependence on antidepressants and tranquilizers render them far less capable of fixing their problems than they were before willingly submitting to the psychiatric industry’s dubious wisdom. Still, I’ve had one person after the next insist to me that they “need” their medication and that I simply don’t “understand” mental illness. No, I feel I perfectly understand what’s going on—the problem isn’t mental illness, it’s character weakness.

What’s striking, though, is that it is no longer the political dissidents who are being force-medicated; rather, it is the pro-statist conformists who are willingly gobbling medication by the bucket. These days, “mental illness” is being blamed for all manner of seemingly willful foul behavior, while the only people deemed to be in complete control of their thoughts and actions are the alleged racists, sexists, and homophobes—modern society’s true dissidents and scapegoats. There are probably isolated cases, but I don’t ever remember “mental illness” being used as a defense against hate-crime charges. Everyone else, though, is a slave to their mental illness.

Ironically, it may be only on psychiatric medication where people truly seem to bear less responsibility for their behavior; hence the fact that so many mass murderers of late are up to their eyeballs in psych meds. You leave their brains alone, and they seem far less likely to go on killing sprees.

The mere idea that people aren’t responsible for their actions apparently leads to less responsible behavior. Various studies have suggested that the less a person believes in free will, the more likely they are to lie, cheat, steal, become aggressive, and fall victim to mindless conformity. The less they believe that they are in control of their actions, the worse they act. Thus, the idea of “mental illness” likely creates more problems than it solves.
Therefore, mental illness doesn’t need to be cured, because it likely doesn’t exist. People need to be cured of the delusion that mental illness, rather than their own lack of willpower, is the problem.

The defense lawyers, psychiatrists, and pill-peddlers who make a living from the idea of mental illness will continue insisting it’s real. After all, that’s their job.

But if the allegations against the pair of preteen girls in Wisconsin are true, blaming it on “mental illness” is as dumb as blaming it on Slender Man. The simplest explanation—yet the hardest for most humans to accept—would be that the girls did it because they chose to do it.

http://takimag.com/article/the_mental_i ... z34k1cNrIn
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Yessica » 16 Jun 2014, 06:44

Paul wrote:The usual caveats about the 'genuine cases'. But who or what are the genuine cases? And so many of them...?


Was that a question directed at me?
I would say that a "proofen" case is a genuin case, for example I would be much more inclined to believe the women who ended up in forster care for being abused than the women who at 40 suddenly remembered, her father and all of his friend engaged in day-long satanic ritual abuse and nobody ever noticed her missing from school, any injuries or whatever.
But of course there are genuine cases of sexual abuse which go unnoticed. However the more unlikely the cases sounds and the more the persons talks about it all of the time the less likely I am to believe it. I might however sometimes come to wrong conclusions and that's why I would never tell a person I don't believe a word she says.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Lindsey » 16 Jun 2014, 07:51

Paul, I'm finding it unclear what kind of conditions you are arguing doesn't exist. The Wisconsin girls are not a good example of any mental illness in broader terms because of the cases extremity. It sounds very likely infact that one of them is severely schizophrenic or do you not believe schizophrenia is real? If not then why can a person be brought to baseline with the correct anti-psychotics within a few days? That's not to say they definitely are, but the case is so rare and bizarre it needs proper investigation. Schizophrenia can also include many non-functioning symptoms like catatonia which would need to be explained in social terms.
The best way to experience schizophrenic thinking is to take something like LSD. A slight change in neurotransmitter will distort reality and thought To the extent that one can wonder why it held such a grip on the mind in the first place. (obviously I'm not suggesting anybody actually do this!)
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Paul » 16 Jun 2014, 09:51

Yessica - I wasn't asking a question of you specifically. It was a general question.

The example(s) you give are good ones. I would say your husband has a phobia, which is a word for an irrational (to everyone else) fear. Some people are terrified of spiders, or worms or whatever. I once had a girlfriend who would act quite alarmingly (in fear) regarding moths. None of these people are mentally ill, in my opinion. If they are, then it follows that a large proportion of the human race can be diagnosed as mentally ill.

Fortunately I'm not among them as I can't think of anything that I fear, where that fear seems irrational.


Lindsey - the post I made was not my words. They are those of Mr Goad. I copy/pasted the whole blog post and then gave the link underneath. However I do broadly agree with the piece, as I said.

I agree with him that the girls are just evil (attempted) murderers. They are only mentally ill or 'schizo' in the way you could say all murderers are mentally ill.

I think the Wisconsin case IS a good example - of the way there's a rush to mitigate criminal actions by quoting mental illness. Of course this is by their lawyer and maybe to be expected but you can bet there will very many people who would go along with this. I don't see what is to be gained by it anyway, for society as a whole. We don't want people like that wandering about. I am personally fed up with hearing about 'why' people did things and how we should understand them and so on. It's the foothills of almost accepting their behaviour and that they have a plight. One or two steps and the perpetrators have suddenly become victims themselves. This to my mind is an incorrect approach.

I don't know that I do believe in schizophrenia. I suppose, given the number of claims that the condition does exist but I'm minded to think it exists in very many less cases than is claimed.

Can supposed mental illnesses really be 'brought to base line' within a few days by popping a few pills? It seems like they are remarkable pills, like no other in the case of other afflictions, or that the complaint wasn't that great in the first place. Having said that, I know of quite a number of people who have acted alarmingly and this has been ascribed to the pills they are taking. We've all heard those stories.

Anti-psychotic pills sound like terrible instruments to me and I would only take them under severe duress - the kind of duress that mental health professionals have a penchant for applying (so I hear). I have a friend who is quite conversant with the 'industry' and their medications and he has mentioned anti-psychotics quite recently (coincidentally) and reinforces my suspicions that they are among the worst things to take. 'They will get their claws into you and make you far worse' was his diagnosis. He used the same terminology for the professionals who like to prescribe them.

Anyway, I realise that sounds rather callous, but so is being murdered, assaulted or suffering criminal damage. I've been assaulted, robbed and suffered criminal damage in spades, and have been grievously disappointed, upset, angry, enfeebled (for a while) and frightened. I've been jumpy and imagined things (and noises) that turned out to be nothing. Almost like voices in the head.

It hasn't resulted in me exhibiting bizarre or criminal behaviour and neither have I taken pills for my mental plight. I'm quite sure that if I did, I would be a lot worse. In fact I suspect that I would never have recovered from the disappointments.

.
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Yessica » 16 Jun 2014, 11:02

deleted by Yessica
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Re: Care in the community

Postby Lindsey » 16 Jun 2014, 12:40

I didn't see you were paraphrasing sorry. I do appreciate what you are saying by over diagnosis , but genuine mental illness and extreme delusional thought does exist and it is usually without a criminal component. Anti-psychotics are indeed terrible to take - IF you do not have an illness. My brother in law is a good anecdotal example , he seemed perfectly normal for years, save being emotionally very flat . He explained he functioned fine whilst taking his cocktail of anti-psychotics and warned several times he was 'crazy' . One day he lost his pills and three days later he was believing he was Jesus, phoning up newspapers to detail his daily goings on as he believed he was famous. He didn't sleep for days and threw a tv out of the bedroom window because people were using it to spy on him. He ended up securely under lock and key, given his meds and within a week was back to normal and extremely upset over the whole incident. This pattern of mania had repeatedly immerged in his life resulting in several suicide attempts. He had had electro convulsive therapy which he said had helped a great deal. Other than minor day to day fluctuations the only time we saw him lose his sanity again was when he tried cannabis and within a few days he was back on the ward until the drug left his system entirely. He's now very fearful of even passively inhaling smoke. His mental illness has ruined his life, he was not able to he a job down and became self employed buying and selling online, but he's resentful of what it's taken away from him , his father is a consultant, his sister owns a wine company. He has very good relations with his family, he feels nothing but humiliation at having an illness he has to control for the rest of his life.
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