Zanzibar to Timbuktu (1988)

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Zanzibar to Timbuktu (1988)

Postby Mike » 03 Jul 2014, 09:39

Another TD travel book from the back catalogue, which I've been very much enjoying. Some of the tales are quite hilarious, even if it now and then branches into what we would now think of as Bill Bryson territory. Interesting that (as TD in fact mentioned in a quite recent piece) he described the racial problems in Rwanda (anno 1987) as being "settled...once and for all". One can't be right about everything...
Mike
 
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Re: Zanzibar to Timbuktu (1988)

Postby Mike » 08 Jul 2014, 03:28

Finished the book this morning. An very enjoyable read, with some real laugh-out-loud moments in every chapter. Of course, there is always a danger with such books that "the natives" will appear principally as comic relief, and to be honest I feel that TD is a little guilty of this at times. But in fairness, the other white travellers he encounters come in for plenty of treatment as well. (Patrick, the Marxist missionary in a Nigerian university town, is unmissable.)
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Re: Zanzibar to Timbuktu (1988)

Postby Jonathan » 08 Jul 2014, 06:29

Mike wrote:Interesting that (as TD in fact mentioned in a quite recent piece) he described the racial problems in Rwanda (anno 1987) as being "settled...once and for all". One can't be right about everything...


He actually mentioned that quote in an article recently. If I'm not mistaken, he was discussing a 1913 travelogue of Russia which perceived no hint of the revolution which was to rock the country a few years later, and indeed hardly mentioned politics at all. He began the article by mentioning his own similar failure in Rwanda.
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Re: Zanzibar to Timbuktu (1988)

Postby Yessica » 08 Jul 2014, 07:20

Mike wrote:Finished the book this morning. An very enjoyable read, with some real laugh-out-loud moments in every chapter. Of course, there is always a danger with such books that "the natives" will appear principally as comic relief, and to be honest I feel that TD is a little guilty of this at times. But in fairness, the other white travellers he encounters come in for plenty of treatment as well. (Patrick, the Marxist missionary in a Nigerian university town, is unmissable.)


I added it to my reading list.
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